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Agenda

10:00am Welcome and Introductions

10:05am What is Working?  What Isn’t?  What could improve SFQ?

Editors’ and Writers’ critical review of:

  • submission process
  • support from Cornell Small Farms Program office
  • magazine’s visibility, content and success

10:20am Editors & Writers Roundtable.   How do you find writers or topics?  How do you know what is timely and relevant?  (i.e. Listserves, Surveys, Conference Brochures, Published Research, Social Media​)

10:40am  Content Review

What does Small Farm Quarterly publish?  What does Small Farm Quarterly reject?  We’ll look at some real-life examples of articles and talk through elements that make a stellar article versus one that gets sent back.

10:55am SFQ Online

Did you know SFQ articles are read online long after their publish date?  We’ll look at some examples of articles that have generated comments from all over the country and the world.

11:10am SFQ Reader Stats: Who are SFQ readers and what are they interested in?

  • Subscriber break-down
  • Ad Trends
  • Reader Analytics​​

11:25am Recognition for Service.  How can we improve upon bringing SFQ contributors and the organizations they represent greater visibility and recognition?

 

 

Earth cooled passive solar straw bale barn with attached greenhouse at Four Winds Farm

No till beds with earth cooled barn and passive solar greenhouse at Four Winds Farm

Are you looking to stabilize rising fuel and energy costs on your farm or homestead?  Are you seeking more sustainable sources of energy?  In this upcoming four-part webinar series, you’ll meet an organic vegetable farmer, grape grower & winemaker, sunflower & biodiesel producer, and pastured livestock farmer who will lead you through a virtual tour of their sustainable farm energy systems and ecological production techniques.

This lunchtime webinar series will run from noon-1:00pm every Friday from April 4th through April 25th.  All of the webinars are free and open to the public.   Registration is required.  Upon registering, you’ll receive an email providing a link and instructions for you to access the series.

This webinar series is sponsored by NE SARE (Northeast Sustainable Ag Research and Education) and the Cornell Small Farms Program.  Please send inquiries tosmallfarmsprogram@cornell.edu. To learn about funding opportunities available from NE SARE, visit www.nesare.org. To learn more about small farm resources and support, visit www.smallfarms.cornell.edu.

April 4th: Organic Vegetable Farm Cools with the Earth: Warms with the Sun
Noon – 1:00pm with Jay Armour of Four Winds Farm, Gardiner, NY
Is it possible to operate a 24 acre diversified vegetable farm with minimal energy use?  Yes!  Jay Armour will take us on a virtual tour of his passive-solar heated and earth-cooled straw-bale vegetable barn with attached greenhouse. At one end of the barn are two root cellars built into a hillside that store root crops throughout the winter with minimal energy use.  A 14-kw grid-intertied PV electric system is situated on the barn roof, which is being financed by a combination of a NYSERDA grant and a low-interest loan. A permanent raised bed system in the vegetable garden requires very little tractor time and hence very minimal fuel use. The Armours also transport vegetables to market in a diesel van converted to run on waste vegetable oil (WVO).  The farm raises produce, heirloom seedlings, grass-fed beef, pasture raised turkeys, and intermittently pasture-raised pork.   PDF Slideshow | Stream Recording |Download Recording

April 11th: Family Vineyard Shrinks Carbon Footprint by 40%
Noon – 1:00pm with Art Hunt of Hunt Country Vineyards, Branchport, NY
Since 2007, Hunt Country Vineyards has reduced total energy costs on their vineyard by 30% and their carbon footprint by more than 40%.  How have they gone about it?  Art Hunt will lead us on a virtual tour of their energy efficient winery, newly insulated warehouse, geothermal heating and cooling system, and vertical wind turbine.  In 2012 the Hunts launched a Locavore Room which celebrates the bounty of local foods and beverages in the Finger Lakes.  The Hunts are proud to say that all food & beverage items (other than wine) they offer for sale on the farm travel an average Distance-from-Source (DfS) of just 162 miles.  Art will also share a variety of ecological production techniques. For example, in 2005, the Hunt family began mixing grape pomace with animal manure and then composting the mix before applying it to the vineyard.  The compost adds vital minerals and nutrients to the soil that help produce outstanding grapes for winemaking and reduce the use of other fertilizers. PDF Slideshow | Stream Recording | Download Recording

April 18th: Sunflowers & Canola to Fuel: Dairy Becomes Biodiesel Production Facility
Noon – 1:00pm with Roger Rainville of Borderview Farm, Alburgh, Vermont
Interested in making biodiesel on your farm or in cooperation with other farmers?  Roger Rainville will take us on a virtual tour of his former dairy-turned-energy farm in Alburgh, Vermont.  In 2008, when diesel prices rose from $4 to $5 per gallon, Roger began planting sunflowers and canola on a portion of his 214 acres and installing biodiesel processing equipment. He harvests the oilseed with a combine, and uses a seed cleaner and grain dryer to prepare the seed for storage in a 60-ton grain bin prior to processing.  He’ll show us how he presses the seed to get two products: oil for biodiesel and pelletized meal for feed or to burn in a pellet stove.  He then sends the oil through a BioPro 190 automated biodiesel processor which can process 100 gallons of oil to fuel per day.  Learn more about his equipment and the seed to fuel process by tuning in to this video. Cosponsored by the Vermont Bioenergy Initiative.  PDF Slideshow | Stream Recording | Download Recording 

April 25th: Thirsty Livestock?  Use Sun or Wind to Power a Remote Watering System
Noon – 1:00pm with Jonathan Barter of Barter Farm, Branchport NY
Are you getting tired of hauling water to livestock in remote pastures?   Jonathan Barter will show us the renewable energy powered watering system on his 210 acre livestock farm (40 Angus cattle and 130 Cheviot and Dorset sheep). In 2010, Jonathan installed a combination wind and solar pumping system which supplies water to 58 acres of pasture. The pumping system consists of a 350 watt turbine, 400 watt solar panels, back up batteries and a deep well pump. Partial funding for this project was provided by USDA – Natural Resources Conservation Service’s Conservation Innovative Grants program.  Description  | PDF Slideshow | Stream Recording | Download Recording

Shannon Mason of Cowbella will speak about transitioning to Lucky Dog Food Hub

Shannon Mason of Cowbella will speak about transitioning to Lucky Dog Food Hub

Statewide meeting March 24th features farmers’ perspectives on food hubs, grocery stores, restaurants & more….

The practice of direct-marketing — selling products face-to-face via farmers markets, CSA’s or farm stands — has traditionally been attractive to small farmers because it cuts out the ‘middle man’, leaving all the revenue in the farmers’ pocket.  It can also offer the satisfaction of a personal relationship with the customer and the fulfillment of feeding the local community. But wearing the ‘marketing hat’ has the disadvantage of consuming significant amounts of time and energy.

Recently, a flurry of new marketing avenues that combine advantages of both direct-marketing and wholesaling have come available.  Options such as food hubs, grocery stores, online marketplaces, or restaurants invite the farmer to hand marketing responsibilities over to a third party, but still sell food to their community or region and in some cases, retain their unique marketing identity.

Are these emerging market avenues right for you?  Trying a new marketing strategy requires investment of time, money, and infrastructure, so you want to make an informed choice.  But with each new marketing option offering something different, what decision aids do you need to choose with confidence?

You can find out at the upcoming Small Farms Summit on March 24th, 2014 from 9:30am – 3:30pm. The full day program, Beyond Direct Marketing: Exploring New Ways to Sell, features small farmers’ perspectives on the pros and cons of selling wholesale.

In the morning, we’ll hear from vegetable farmer Darren Maum of Salvere Farm, inMarietta, NY.  Darren has recently joined Farmshed, a Central NY company that has enabled Darren to sell a larger volume of product by handling transportation and relationship building efforts with customers, saving Darren valuable time and resources.  Next, Shannon Mason of Cowbella in Jefferson, NY, will describe how a shift to wholesaling through Lucky Dog Local Food Hub has enabled her to invest in new production and processing strategies for her value added dairy products.  Finally, Stephen Winkler of Lucki7 Livestock Co. in Rodman, NY will reflect on how a transition to Wegmans, Whole Foods and a White Tablecloth Distributor has transformed his product mix and marketing strategy.

All speakers will address their decision making process in switching to a new wholesale market, benefits and challenges, costs, and infrastructure needed.  Farmer speakers will also address how well the new market meets their goals, values or other lifestyle preferences.

After sharing lunch, you’ll have the opportunity to join fellow farmers from your region to swap ideas about specific wholesale marketing opportunities in your area. This interactive ‘wholesale market mapping’ activity will result in generating regional needs for projects that the Cornell Small Farms Program may fund over the next few years.

To register for the 2014 Small Farms Summit, Beyond Direct Marketing: Exploring New Ways to Sell, select the nearest meeting location from the list below and then register online. If you prefer, you may also register via phone. The meeting is free to attend and lunch will be provided.  An agenda is available here.  General questions about the Summit should be directed to smallfarmsprogram@cornell.edu.


Choose from 7 meeting locations across NYS

Choose from 7 meeting locations across NYS

Small Farms Summit Regional Host Sites

Fingerlakes Region: Wayne County,  Cornell Cooperative Extension office

Address:  1581 Rte 88N, Newark, NY 14513
Contact:  Elizabeth Claypoole at wayne@cornell.edu  or 315-331-8415

Central NY: Mann Library, Agriculture Quad, Cornell University Campus
Address: Tower Road, Ithaca, NY 14853
Contact: Violet Stone at vws7@cornell.edu or 607-255-9227

Eastern NY: Albany County, Cornell Cooperative Extension office
Address:  24 Martin Road, Voorheesville, NY 12186
Contact: Gale Kohler at gek4@cornell.edu or 518-765-3500

Hudson Valley: Ulster County, Cornell Cooperative Extension office
Address:  232 Plaza Road, Kingston NY 12401
Contact: Carrie Anne Doyle at cad266@cornell.edu or 845-340-3990

Northern NY: St. Lawrence County, Cornell Cooperative Extension office
Address: Extension Learning Farm Classroom at 2043 SH 68, Canton, NY  13617
Contact: Brent Buchanan at bab22@cornell.edu or 315-379-9192 Ext 231

Western NY: Cattaraugus County, Cornell Cooperative Extension Office
Address: 28 Parkside Drive, Ellicottville, NY 14731
Contact: Lynn Bliven at lao3@cornell.edu or 585-268-7644

Long Island: Suffolk County, Cornell Cooperative Extension Office
Address:  423 Griffing Ave, Riverhead, NY 11901
Contact:  Sandy Menasha at srm45@cornell.edu or 631-727-7850

 

Due to heavy snow and freezing rain forecast across upstate New York, the 2014 NY Small Farms Summit, Beyond Direct Marketing: Exploring New Ways to Sell, is rescheduled for March 24th. If you were previously registered for this event and still plan to attend, please complete a new registration form.

Are you currently selling through a farmers’ market, csa, u-pick, or road-side stand? How well is it working? Direct-marketing can offer the satisfaction of a personal relationship with the customer, but wearing the ‘marketing hat’ has the disadvantage of consuming lots of time and energy.

In recent years, a variety of new wholesale markets such as food hubs, online marketplaces, restaurants, and grocery stores have begun recruiting regional products from small to mid-sized farms.  Could these emerging wholesale markets be right for you?

You can find out at the upcoming Small Farms Summit on March 24th, 2014 from 9:30am – 3:30pm. The program, Beyond Direct Marketing: Exploring New Ways to Sell, features small farmers’ perspectives on the pros and cons of selling wholesale.  Farmers that have made a successful switch to a new wholesale market will reflect on their decision making process, benefits and challenges, costs, and infrastructure needed.  Farmer speakers will also address how well the new market meets their goals, values or other lifestyle preferences. Click to download a copy of the 2014 Summit Agenda.

After sharing lunch, you’ll have the opportunity to join fellow farmers from your region to swap ideas about specific wholesale marketing opportunities in your area. This interactive ‘wholesale market mapping’ activity will result in generating regional needs for projects that the Cornell Small Farms Program may fund over the next few years.

To register for the Small Farms Summit, Beyond Direct Marketing: Exploring New Ways to Sell, locate your nearest host location from the list below and then  register online. If you prefer, you may also register via phone. The meeting is free to attend and lunch will be provided.  General questions about the Summit should be directed to smallfarmsprogram@cornell.edu.

Small Farms Summit Regional Host SitesNewYorkMapWithSites

Fingerlakes Region: Wayne County,  Cornell Cooperative Extension office
Address:  
1581 Rte 88N, Newark, NY 14513
Contact:  
Elizabeth Claypoole at wayne@cornell.edu  or 315-331-8415

Central NY: Mann Library, Agriculture Quad, Cornell University Campus
Address: Tower Road, Ithaca, NY 14853
Contact: Violet Stone at vws7@cornell.edu or 607-255-9227

Eastern NY: Albany County, Cornell Cooperative Extension office
Address:  24 Martin Road, Voorheesville, NY 12186
Contact: Gale Kohler at gek4@cornell.edu or 518-765-3500

Hudson Valley: Ulster County, Cornell Cooperative Extension office
Address:  232 Plaza Road, Kingston NY 12401
Contact: Carrie Anne Doyle at cad266@cornell.edu or 845-340-3990

Northern NY: St. Lawrence County, Cornell Cooperative Extension office
Address: Extension Learning Farm Classroom at 2043 SH 68, Canton, NY  13617
Contact: Brent Buchanan at bab22@cornell.edu or 315-379-9192 Ext 231

Western NY: Cattaraugus County, Cornell Cooperative Extension Office
Address: 28 Parkside Drive, Ellicottville, NY 14731
Contact: Lynn Bliven at lao3@cornell.edu or 585-268-7644

Long Island: Suffolk County, Cornell Cooperative Extension Office
Address:  423 Griffing Ave, Riverhead, NY 11901
Contact:  Sandy Menasha at srm45@cornell.edu or 631-727-7850

Register Online  

Chicks_Higher_ResWe are pleased to announce a new host site location for the 2014 NY Small Farms Summit. If you are located in the Fingerlakes Region, you can now attend the program, Beyond Direct Marketing: Exploring New Ways to Sell, at the Wayne County Cornell Cooperative Extension office in Newark, NY.

Are you currently selling through a farmers’ market, csa, u-pick, or road-side stand? How well is it working? Direct-marketing usually provides a higher return on your dollar and the satisfaction of a personal relationship with the customer, but wearing the ‘marketing hat’ has the disadvantage of consuming lots of time and energy.

In recent years, a variety of new wholesale markets such as food hubs, online marketplaces, restaurants, and grocery stores have begun recruiting regional products from small to mid-sized farms. Could these emerging wholesale markets be right for you?

You can find out at the upcoming Small Farms Summit on March 12th, 2014 from 9:30am – 3:30pm. The program, Beyond Direct Marketing: Exploring New Ways to Sell, features small farmers’ perspectives on the pros and cons of selling wholesale. Farmers that have made a successful switch to a new wholesale market will reflect on their decision making process, benefits and challenges, costs, and infrastructure needed. Farmer speakers will also address how well the new market meets their goals, values or other lifestyle preferences.

After sharing lunch, you’ll have the opportunity to join fellow farmers from your region to swap ideas about specific wholesale marketing opportunities in your area. This interactive ‘wholesale market mapping’ activity will result in generating regional needs for projects that the Cornell Small Farms Program may fund over the next few years.

To register for the Small Farms Summit, Beyond Direct Marketing: Exploring New Ways to Sell, locate your nearest host location from the list below and then register online. If you prefer, you may also register via phone. The meeting is free to attend and lunch will be provided. General questions about the Summit should be directed to smallfarmsprogram@cornell.edu


NewYorkSummitMapSmall Farms Summit Regional Host Sites

New! Fingerlakes Region: Wayne County, Cornell Cooperative Extension office
Address: 1581 Rte 88N, Newark, NY 14513
Contact: Elizabeth Claypoole at wayne@cornell.edu or 315-331-8415

Central NY: Mann Library, Agriculture Quad, Cornell University Campus
Address: Tower Road, Ithaca, NY 14853
Contact: Violet Stone at vws7@cornell.edu or 607-255-9227

Eastern NY: Albany County, Cornell Cooperative Extension office
Address: 24 Martin Road, Voorheesville, NY 12186
Contact: Gale Kohler at gek4@cornell.edu or 518-765-3500

Hudson Valley: Ulster County, Cornell Cooperative Extension office
Address: 232 Plaza Road, Kingston NY 12401
Contact: Carrie Anne Doyle at cad266@cornell.edu or 845-340-3990

Northern NY: St. Lawrence County, Cornell Cooperative Extension office
Address: Extension Learning Farm Classroom at 2043 SH 68, Canton, NY 13617
Contact: Brent Buchanan at bab22@cornell.edu or 315-379-9192 Ext 231

Western NY: Cattaraugus County, Cornell Cooperative Extension Office
Address: 28 Parkside Drive, Ellicottville, NY 14731
Contact: Lynn Bliven at lao3@cornell.edu or 585-268-7644

Long Island: Suffolk County, Cornell Cooperative Extension Office
Address: 423 Griffing Ave, Riverhead, NY 11901
Contact: Sandy Menasha at srm45@cornell.edu or 631-727-7850

Register Online

Thank you to the 450 farmers that have taken this survey! Since responses are still pouring in, we have extended the deadline to Wednesday, February 26th to give you a few more days to give input!

Are you a Small Farmer? Where do YOU sell? Take this Survey to ID Small Farm Marketing Trends

Are you satisfied with your current marketing strategy(s)?  Looking for new or better ways to sell your products?  The Cornell Small Farms Program is seeking farmer input to better understand small farm marketing trends via an online survey. This survey will take 8 – 14 minutes and is primarily for small and mid-sized farmers.

Take the Survey

As a thank you, after completing the survey, you will have the opportunity to register for one of three $100 gift card drawings to an agricultural supplier of your choice! Gift card registration takes place at a separate website to ensure that your responses to this survey remain anonymous.

Information from the survey will help us to design educational programs and resources that address your current marketing interests.  Specifically, this information will 1) define the focal themes for the upcoming Small Farms Summit: Beyond Direct Marketing: Exploring New Ways To Sell to take place March 12th, 2014 and 2) identify the key topics for a new E-book for small farmers called The Small Farmers Guide to Direct Wholesale.

To learn about the upcoming NY Small Farms Summit on March 12th, click here.

The survey deadline has been extended to Wednesday, February 26th, 2014.  The Cornell Small Farms Program will make an announcement when results are publicly available at www.smallfarms.cornell.edu

*Please note, this survey targets the opinions and interests of those actively farming and selling agricultural products at this time.

If you have questions about this survey, please contact:
Anusuya Rangarajan at ar47@cornell.edu.

Are you currently selling through a farmers’ market, csa, u-pick, or road-side stand? How well is it working? Direct-marketing can offer the satisfaction of a personal relationship with the customer, but wearing the ‘marketing hat’ has the disadvantage of consuming lots of time and energy.

In recent years, a variety of new wholesale markets such as food hubs, online marketplaces, restaurants, and grocery stores have begun recruiting regional products from small to mid-sized farms.  Could these emerging wholesale markets be right for you?

You can find out at the upcoming Small Farms Summit on March 12th, 2014 from 9:30am – 3:30pm. The program, Beyond Direct Marketing: Exploring New Ways to Sell, features small farmers’ perspectives on the pros and cons of selling wholesale.  Farmers that have made a successful switch to a new wholesale market will reflect on their decision making process, benefits and challenges, costs, and infrastructure needed.  Farmer speakers will also address how well the new market meets their goals, values or other lifestyle preferences.

After sharing lunch, you’ll have the opportunity to join fellow farmers from your region to swap ideas about specific wholesale marketing opportunities in your area. This interactive ‘wholesale market mapping’ activity will result in generating regional needs for projects that the Cornell Small Farms Program may fund over the next few years.

To ensure the meeting addresses your top marketing interests, wholesale channel topics featured during the Summit will be selected directly from responses to this small farm marketing trends survey.  We encourage you to take this pre-Summit survey by the deadline of Friday, February 26th. As a thank you, you will have the opportunity to register for one of three $100 gift card drawings to an agricultural supplier of your choice.

To register for the Small Farms Summit, Beyond Direct Marketing: Exploring New Ways to Sell, locate your nearest host location from the list below and then  register online. If you prefer, you may also register via phone. The meeting is free to attend and lunch will be provided.  General questions about the Summit should be directed to smallfarmsprogram@cornell.edu.

Small Farms Summit Regional Host Sites

New Site Added! Fingerlakes Region: Wayne County,  Cornell Cooperative Extension office
Address:  
1581 Rte 88N, Newark, NY 14513
Contact:  
Elizabeth Claypoole at wayne@cornell.edu  or 315-331-8415

Central NY: Mann Library, Agriculture Quad, Cornell University Campus
Address: Tower Road, Ithaca, NY 14853
Contact: Violet Stone at vws7@cornell.edu or 607-255-9227

Eastern NY: Albany County, Cornell Cooperative Extension office
Address:  24 Martin Road, Voorheesville, NY 12186
Contact: Gale Kohler at gek4@cornell.edu or 518-765-3500

Hudson Valley: Ulster County, Cornell Cooperative Extension office
Address:  232 Plaza Road, Kingston NY 12401
Contact: Carrie Anne Doyle at cad266@cornell.edu or 845-340-3990

Northern NY: St. Lawrence County, Cornell Cooperative Extension office
Address: Extension Learning Farm Classroom at 2043 SH 68, Canton, NY  13617
Contact: Brent Buchanan at bab22@cornell.edu or 315-379-9192 Ext 231

Western NY: Cattaraugus County, Cornell Cooperative Extension Office
Address: 28 Parkside Drive, Ellicottville, NY 14731
Contact: Lynn Bliven at lao3@cornell.edu or 585-268-7644

Long Island: Suffolk County, Cornell Cooperative Extension Office
Address:  423 Griffing Ave, Riverhead, NY 11901
Contact:  Sandy Menasha at srm45@cornell.edu or 631-727-7850

Register Online     |   Take the Survey

Are you satisfied with your current marketing strategy?  Looking for new or better ways to sell your products?  The Cornell Small Farms Program is seeking farmer input to better understand small farm marketing trends via an online survey.  This survey will take 8 – 14 minutes and is primarily for small and mid-sized farmers.       Take the Survey

As a thank you, after completing the survey, you will have the opportunity to register for one of three $100 gift card drawings to an agricultural supplier of your choice! Gift card registration takes place at a separate website to ensure that your responses to this survey remain anonymous.

Information from the survey will help us to design educational programs and resources that address your current marketing interests.  Specifically, this information will 1) define the focal themes for the upcoming Small Farms Summit: Beyond Direct Marketing: Exploring New Ways To Sell to take place March 12th, 2014 and 2) identify the key topics for a new E-book for small farmers called The Small Farmers Guide to Wholesale.   Take the Survey

The survey will close Friday, February 21st, 2014.  The Cornell Small Farms Program will make an announcement when results are publicly available at www.smallfarms.cornell.edu

*Please note, this survey targets the opinions and interests of those actively farming and selling agricultural products at this time.

If you have questions about this survey, please contact:
Anusuya Rangarajan at 607-255-7180 or ar47@cornell.edu

Nearly a million people have watched the videos on our YouTube channel demonstrating how successful small farmers grow food. Now you can help the excellent videographer behind these clips, Peter Carroll Productions, produce more videos by contributing to his Indiegogo campaign  “Small Farm Videos: Learn How Successful Small Farms Produce Good Food.” He has uncut footage of all aspects of tree fruit farming, farming with draft animals, building and growing in an unheated hoophouse, and more. With the funds from this campaign, he will produce 15-20 more high-quality video clips and make them freely available at our YouTube channel.We’ve received thousands of comments from people who found our existing videos helpful in a very practical way: new farmers have developed the confidence to start their farms or tackle a specific farm task while experienced farmers have gotten new ideas to improve their operations. A typical comment we receive is: “I want to thank you for all the generous and detailed information you have shared with the public. It has helped us two city-gone-country people.”

Perfect for alternative Christmas gifts, check out the cool perks available to contributors, including hard copy “sneak previews”, Associate Producer credits on all the videos, free beginning farmer online courses, and more! Gift yourself or the new farmer in your life with extraordinary new farm videos this year!

The campaign ends in Dec. 27, 2013, so please support it by contributing money or spreading the word through your social networks now!

As a small farmer, finding the time to look up the latest agriculture research and extension projects unfolding on the Cornell University campus can be a challenge, especially during the growing season.  Yet, while you’re putting in long hours in the fields, faculty, staff and extension at the Cornell University College of Agriculture and Life Sciences (CALS) are hard at work conducting research to support you.  From developing new raspberry cultivars to identifying helpful management practices to reduce labor during lambing, CALS is engaged in a wide variety of projects to improve production, marketing, and business management for small farms of all enterprises in New York.

In an effort to create quick and easy access to these projects, the Cornell Small Farms Program is pleased to announce release of the new “Campus to Farm Guide: A Directory of Cornell University Research and Extension Projects Supporting Small Farms.”  The Guide brings ongoing research in horticulture, small dairy, livestock, field crops and forages, agroforestry, farm energy and more, together into one easily navigable booklet.  Each project listing includes a short, descriptive summary and points you quickly to top impacts of the project, relevance to small farms, and contact information.  The Guide also directs you toward resources such as the Northeast Center for Food Entrepreneurship or the NYS Integrated Pest Management Program.

The “Campus to Farm Guide” can be viewed online or downloaded as a PDF from the Cornell Small Farms Program website:  http://smallfarms.cornell.edu/resources/

If you have questions about the Guide, or are aware of a relevant project missing from this resource, please contact Anu Rangarajan at ar47@cornell.edu or 607-255-1780.

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